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ElMindA Brain Monitor Cleared by FDA

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Monday, August 18th, 2014

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Neuroscience company ElMindA is revolutionising the management of brain disorders and injuries through its futuristic brain monitoring ‘helmet’.

 

ElMindA’s Brain Network Activity system is used to analyse neural processes, with the potential to reveal brain problems early on and thus increase the efficacy of treatment for disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Earlier this month, the United States Food and Drug Administration cleared ElMindA’s BNA™  Analysis System  for the assessment of brain function in 18-24 year olds. Jeffrey S. Kutcher, M.D., associate professor of neurology, University of Michigan Medical School has noted that ElMindA “will allow those of us caring for patients the ability to more clearly differentiate a healthy brain from one affected by disease or injury, and potentially have more informed discussions about lifestyle, activity, prevention and treatment decisions as a result.”

This is a highly innovative technology, not just in its ability to provide doctors with a comprehensive view of brain health, but in the sense that unlike similar technologies, it does not require penetration of the skull, instead taking measurements via a sensor-laden ‘helmet’. This system is fitted with numerous electrodes that measure brain activity. The data drawn from its interaction with a user’s brain functions is analysed by specially-developed algorithms that work to reveal neural pathways. This data is able to assist doctors in understanding of brain functionality, following disease progression and measuring responses to medical intervention.

“Greater understanding of how our brain processes information, how it gets its job done, ultimately holds the potential to improve brain health and disease management over a person’s lifetime,” said Ronen Gadot, CEO of ElMindA.

ElMindA’s database covers almost every known brain disorder, and it is being used in many institutions. Last year ElMindA was a finalist for the million dollar Global Breakthrough Research and Innovation in Neurotechnology Prize.